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Design dream team behind Kinma Valley

 

When visiting or living at a Lendlease community, you may notice the lush greenery, parks and manicured pathways, and you may not think much about how it all came to be, but these two professionals have.

Directors of Urbis, Landscape Architect Glen Power and Urban Designer Michael Webb, are the duo who came up with Kinma Valley’s design after input from local community members and environmental groups.

As they carefully put together the puzzle of a master planned community with pieces of neighbourhood interaction and natural environment, Glen and Michael knew every aspect of Kinma Valley has its own individual place, and for good reason.

Both directors are passionate about constructing communities for a better future and their responsibility is colossal as future residents of Kinma Valley future rely on Glen and Michael’s innovation and vision to shape the way locals experience, live, and feel within the space.

The design duo have both been in the business for more than 20 years, creating places to delight and inspire, and they believe Kinma Valley is one of their main project highlights.

For Glen, having creative freedom in the design process was important, as it meant he and Michael could really focus on moulding the shape of Kinma Valley into a lifestyle community embodying happiness and contentment.

“Lendlease allowed the landscape architecture and urban design to really drive the project, so we could create something truly beautiful. We instantly recognised the value of Kinma Valley’s site; the beautiful vegetation, the fauna environment, and the existing landscape,” Glen said.

With the community and environment at the forefront of their minds, Glen and Michael took an innovative approach when planning Kinma Valley’s layout, conversing with locals to gain an insight into their opinions and ideas.

“We had a lot of conversations with the community about their views and integrated that into our design. One of our key design drivers was to bring all the parks into green linear corridors, which required a different way of thinking,” Michael explained.