10 ways to keep kids entertained indoors

When it’s rainy and chilly outside, there’s still a wealth of fun to be had indoors – and it might just lead to you connecting more as a family, too. Because sometimes, it’s the simplest things that can create the most magical memories.

 

1.The ‘Day 1’ activity 

Make a point of doing something simple to mark the turning of the seasons. For example, on the first night of winter, toast some marshmallows or make hot chocolate. 

2.Daily favourites 

Eating dinner together is a wonderful ritual in itself but take it a step further and create a tradition that once a week, everyone recounts their favourite moment of that week. Jot it in a journal to look back on.

3. Holiday at home 

Forget expensive airfares! Travel to a new part of the world every month by cooking a nation’s signature dish. Get the kids to choose a country and make it a family project to research the meal, buy the ingredients and make the recipe together. Extra points for decorating the table and dressing up. 

4. Monthly mystery tour 

Use the time you’re stuck indoors to plan the next adventure outdoors. Take it in turns each rainy day to choose a new place to drive or walk to. It could be to a farm an hours’ drive away to pick apples; or a park you’ve never been to. Plot why you’ll go, how you’ll get there and plan an itinerary and menu for the big day.

5. Movie time! 

Choose a movie you’ll all enjoy. Set up the living room with blankets, pillows and throws and snuggle in for a viewing. Make popcorn, share lollies and enjoy the show.  

6. Circle stories

Get everyone together with someone starting the story. Go around until everyone has added their piece to the story. Record it on your phone so the story is captured forever.

  Family traditions  

9. Weekend artworks

Dedicate a jar to rainy day fun. Get the kids to regularly pick up a few items from nature or around the house (a button, a lost barbie’s shoe) and pop it inside. When you have to stay indoors, make a crazy collage together.

10. Back to your roots

If you practise a faith, you probably already have great traditions in place. If not, celebrate your family history by doing something your grandparents or great-grandparents may have done. “My husband is Jewish but isn’t very religious, so every few months we do Friday night custom of lighting candles and saying prayers over wine and challah, the traditional plaited bread,” says Harmony Behr, 35, from Clovelly NSW. “I want to teach our two boys about their cultural heritage.”